Arts & Culture

Granoff hosts Pakistani Renaissance woman

By
Senior Staff Writer
Friday, February 3, 2012

Samina Quraeshi is a Renaissance woman in every sense of the phrase. A native of Pakistan, she has worn the hats of author, artist, architect, speaker, academic, photographer, curator — and now filmmaker.

Quraeshi presented clips from her upcoming documentary, “The Other Half of Tomorrow: Women Changing Pakistan,” to a rapt audience of roughly 30 students and Rhode Island natives Wednesday night in the Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts. The richly detailed and tenderly shot film tells the stories of women in Pakistan trying to make positive changes in their surroundings as entrepreneurs, public health workers and dance instructors, among other jobs.

In an address before the screening, Quraeshi said her motive behind producing the film was to present the human face of a region often vilified in the media.

“I want to use art to introduce complex cultural nuances,” she said. “Sensationalist portrayals begin to warp the public’s consciousness of the people who live in (Pakistan).”

Soft-spoken and often dryly humorous, Quraeshi also emphasized that understanding a place’s history is essential to understanding its culture.

“During the past Bush era, there was a culture of fear on top of a lack of awareness,” she told The Herald. “It made people want to get into their houses and watch their TVs, but all the media coverage was doing was propagating stereotypes.”

The film preview was part of a national series called “Caravanserai: A Place Where Cultures Meet,” which aims to introduce American audiences to contemporary Muslim artists. The Providence nonprofit FirstWorks competed fiercely with organizations across the country to host Caravanserai in the city, said Kathleen Pletcher, executive artistic director of FirstWorks. Only four other U.S. nonprofits earned a spot as a stop on the tour.

“There’s this idea of a caravanserai as a place where weary travelers along the road stop and rest and share their stories,” Pletcher said. “It’s a very collective act. And that’s what we’re hoping to do here — connect art with audience.”

The next Caravanserai event is a Feb. 7 screening of “Made in Pakistan,” a documentary from Pakistani filmmaker Ayesha Khan. Quraeshi’s film is slated to be released in October.

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