Science & Research

Seny Kamara, associate professor of computer science, served on the committee that discussed cybersecurity issues in the 21st century.

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Report explores solutions to encryption debate

March 20, 2018 0 comments

In the wake of the 2015 San Bernardino terror attack, the nation witnessed a new and unfamiliar debate when the FBI — in possession of the shooter’s encrypted iPhone 5c — tried to compel Apple to provide “exceptional access” to the phone’s encrypted contents.

The third annual Brain Fair, part of Brain Week Rhode Island, played host to more than 800 attendees learning about brain science research.

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Fair educates community on brain science

March 18, 2018 0 comments

Housed in the recently opened Engineering Research Center, the Brown Brain Fair welcomed more than 800 attendees to learn more about brain sciences Saturday.

Statewide program treats opioid use disorder in jails, prisons

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Statewide program treats opioid use disorder in jails, prisons

March 14, 2018 0 comments

The Rhode Island Department of Corrections’ medication-assisted treatment program reduced overdose deaths among recently incarcerated persons in the state by  61 percent and cut the number of overdose deaths statewide by nearly 12 percent, according to a recent study published by JAMA Psychiatry.

Researchers found that  a new material — Cesium Titanium (IV) Bromide — can take the place of lead in a specific type of solar panel that is more affordable and offers increased conductivity.

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New research aims to improve solar panels

March 7, 2018 0 comments

According to a recent study by University researchers, a new material called Cesium Titanium (IV) Bromide can replace lead in a specific type of solar panel.

Erin Beck PhD ’12 conducted extensive research on two NGOs in Guatemala: Namaste and Fraternity. A large portion of her effort was spent collecting information about Namaste’s impact on the female entrepenuers it aims to empower, ultimately finding that many well-intentioned programs fall short of expectations.

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Erin Beck weighs effectiveness of NGOs in Guatemala

March 7, 2018 0 comments

Erin Beck PhD ’12, associate professor of political science at the University of Oregon, began her dissertation on the role of nongovernmental organizations with a simple question in mind: NGOs may come into “developing” nations intending to bring about constructive change, but are they actually effective in doing so?

Mineralogy found on moon’s South Pole-Aitken basin provides evidence for mantle and volcanic material on the lunar surface, according to a study by University researchers.

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Scientists map mineralogy of large lunar basin

March 6, 2018 0 comments

University researchers recently published a study examining the mineralogy of the moon’s South Pole-Aitken basin, which could serve as guidance for future explorations on the moon.

A study conducted by the Fox-Kemper Lab found that energy dissipation of large-scale ocean turbulence follows a lognormal statistical distribution. This finding could increase the accuracy of climate models.

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University researchers gain further understanding of ocean turbulence

March 5, 2018 0 comments

Scientists have long examined the dynamics of the ocean, and a recent study conducted by University researchers brings new insight into the properties of ocean turbulence.

Researchers reveal sex-based disparities in stroke risk

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Researchers reveal sex-based disparities in stroke risk

March 5, 2018 0 comments

Risk factors for stroke have a disproportionate effect on women compared to men, which may be due to a lack of effective treatment and preventive care, according to a University study published in the journal “Stroke” last month.

Lecture contemplates intersection of faith, science

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Lecture contemplates intersection of faith, science

March 5, 2018 0 comments

“There is something very dignified about (God) allowing the creativity of the Universe to be present within it and slowly emerge, rather than just putting everything in order from the beginning,” said Karin Öberg.

New University technology detects ancient mutations

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New University technology detects ancient mutations

March 4, 2018 0 comments

A new tool developed by University researchers, dubbed SWIF(r), can identify certain genes in humans — ones that result from “adaptive mutations,” genetic differences which have spread amongst a population over time to become more common.