Science & Research

Tropical tree study uses satellite technology

News

Tropical tree study uses satellite technology

October 29, 2018 0 comments

In a study of a species of brightly-flowering trees, a University professor used satellite imagery to observe how the trees’ population density affects their spread.

News

Study shows breastfed infants have higher stress tolerance

October 29, 2018 0 comments

A study published this month illustrates a biological link between a mother’s breastfeeding and other nurturing behaviors on the health of her baby. The study showed that breastfeeding is associated with higher tolerance to stress, as indicated by difference levels in cortisol — ­a stress response hormone.

In addition to developing new criteria for using lumbar punctures to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, University researchers are exploring the use of eye exams for early detection.

News

U. Professor integrates use of spinal taps in Alzheimer’s diagnosis

October 22, 2018 0 comments

In the battle to understand Alzheimer’s disease, advancements in the testing and development of new technologies aim to provide stronger support for treatment.

University study examines effects of SNAP benefits

News

University study examines effects of SNAP benefits

October 22, 2018 0 comments

Families who receive benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program use fewer discount coupons and allot more money for spending on food than they would without assistance, according to a forthcoming paper in the American Economic Review by Justine Hastings and Jesse Shapiro, professors of economics.

Lauren Weinstock (pictured), associate professor psychiatry and human behavior, and Jennifer Johnson, professor of public health at Michigan State University, are leading a study researching suicide prevention methods.

News

Researchers aim to reduce suicides among former prisoners

October 19, 2018 0 comments

A new $1 million grant was added to a $6.8 million study from 2015 attempting to determine intentionality of opioid overdoses in people recently released from prison.

University researchers used worm models to challenge the idea that all ALS-affected neurons decay the same way.

News

New worm models offer insight into ALS degeneration

October 19, 2018 0 comments

Brown researchers studying the degeneration of neurons in worm models with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis recently found that different types of neurons undergo different mechanisms of decay.

Panel talks importance of trans-centered research

News

Panel talks importance of trans-centered research

October 18, 2018 0 comments

At an event hosted by the School of Public Health Wednesday night, Michelle Forcier, professor of pediatrics and associate dean of medicine at the Alpert Medical School, posed a pertinent question: “How many people in this room experience gender?” Everyone in the room raised their hands.

Francois Luks’ course has inspired similar offerings around the country in the small but growing discipline of medical illustration.

News

Course explores intersection of art, medicine

October 15, 2018 0 comments

As a practicing physician, Francois Luks, professor of surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology at the Alpert Medical School, regularly used drawings to illustrate complicated medical concepts to his patients.

Carlos Vargas-Irwin’s $1.5 million award will benefit BrainGate, a program that aims to research paralysis and other movement disorders.

News

Neuroscience professor receives $1.5 million to study sensory information

October 14, 2018 0 comments

The fields of neuroscience and neurotechnology have been growing in recent years as researchers hope to understand the inner workings of the human species’ most puzzling organ: the brain.

This chart shows that there is no association between job growth in a given U.S. metropolitan area and average income of those who grew up as low-income in those areas; job growth and upward mobility are not correlated.

News

Opportunity Insights helps craft policy

October 11, 2018 0 comments

It is well known that a person’s environment impacts them in many ways, but researchers have recently found that upward mobility is influenced not only by the city or region where a person grew up, but the exact neighborhood they called home.