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Opinions

Opinions pieces published in The Herald — which include columns, op-eds, letters to the editor, and editorials — are written independently of news coverage. More information on the difference between these formats can be found at https://www.browndailyherald.com/submissions/.

De Padova ’24: The unfair advantage of applying early decision

Columns, Uncategorized

De Padova ’24: The unfair advantage of applying early decision

October 15, 2020 0 comments

As we move further into fall, many people look forward to apple orchards, hayrides and Halloween. But for high school seniors around the world, it’s the day after Oct. 31 that they have circled on their calendars. On Nov. 1, scores of hopeful Brunonians will submit their Early Decision applications.

Walsh ’23: The promises and pitfalls of ranked-choice voting

Columns

Walsh ’23: The promises and pitfalls of ranked-choice voting

October 14, 2020 0 comments

When Massachusetts Representative Joe Kennedy III, a fairly liberal member of Congress, made the puzzling decision to run against progressive stalwart Senator Ed Markey, the Massachusetts political media turned its attention to the race.

Ruzicka ’21: Our future is Open Access

Columns

Ruzicka ’21: Our future is Open Access

October 14, 2020 1 comment

As we continue to weather the COVID-19 pandemic, Brown students remain scattered across the world. Both those that are in Providence and those operating remotely have felt the pains of not having the same access to academic resources as they do during a normal semester. 

Groboski ’24: Are Our Politicians Ready to Take Climate Change Seriously?

Op-eds

Groboski ’24: Are Our Politicians Ready to Take Climate Change Seriously?

October 13, 2020 0 comments

On Sept. 19, 2020, Americans watched in shock and horror as the Metronome Climate Clock was unveiled in New York City. The display, which displayed warnings like “The Earth has a deadline,” was programmed to highlight the existential threat that climate change poses to our species’ survival.

Reed ’21: Katie Hill is No Hero

Columns

Reed ’21: Katie Hill is No Hero

October 12, 2020 0 comments

Does Katie Hill think we all have amnesia? As you may recall (or may not if you’re in the amnesia crowd), former Congresswoman Hill of California was accused last October of having sexual relationships with several of her subordinates. Hill denied any inappropriate relationships with her congressional staff.

Pollard ’21: It’s time to talk about student-faculty online interactions

Columns

Pollard ’21: It’s time to talk about student-faculty online interactions

October 12, 2020 0 comments

The University has implemented a myriad of new policies to address necessary changes for operating safely during the pandemic, but no adjustments have been made to address the issue of misconduct online, especially as it exists across professional power divides.

Editorial: It’s time for better COVID-19 guidelines

Editorials

Editorial: It’s time for better COVID-19 guidelines

October 8, 2020 2 comments

As students have adjusted to a new normal of mask-wearing and social distancing on College Hill, the University has done well keeping student COVID-19 cases in check, boasting a remarkably low positivity rate.

Editors’ note: With a return to in-person classes, a return to limited print

Editors' Note

Editors’ note: With a return to in-person classes, a return to limited print

October 8, 2020 1 comment

When we all abruptly left campus back in March, we packed up two homes: our dorms, and the office of The Herald at 195 Angell St. We did not know when we would see our friends again, or when we would be back on campus — and we certainly didn’t know when we would be able to print a paper again.

Hong ’24: The Minneapolis I could not see

Columns

Hong ’24: The Minneapolis I could not see

October 8, 2020 0 comments

In late August, I rode the train — the light rail — through Minneapolis. Collapsed buildings, piles of rubble and boarded-up stores blurred past my window. Minneapolis, which I had known for a decade, was a city that I had never seen before: It was ravaged.

Apple ’21: A vote for Biden, a vote for empathy

Columns

Apple ’21: A vote for Biden, a vote for empathy

October 8, 2020 2 comments

In early February, at a CNN Town Hall, Episcopalian pastor Anthony Thompson, whose wife was killed in the Charleston Church shooting, asked Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden about his faith and about how he would use it in the Oval Office.