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Celebrating Black history at Brown

George Washington Milford and Inman Page, Class of 1877, were the University's first Black graduates.

News, University News

“Genius is not always the gift of those in fortunate circumstances”: Brown’s first Black graduates

February 4, 2021 1 comment

On a Wednesday in June 1877, a procession of hundreds of students, alumni and community members marched across the campus of Brown University. Led by a marching band and a Providence sheriff, they crossed College, Benefit, Waterman and Main streets on the way to the First Baptist Meeting House. 

Ethel Tremaine Robinson overcame severe racism and sexism in order to become Brown’s first Black female alum in 1905, when she graduated from the University with honors.

News, University News

Brown’s first Black female graduate: Ethel Robinson’s legacy on College Hill

February 11, 2021 0 comments

Life at Brown had been changing rapidly at the turn of the 20th century.  A decade before, in 1891, University President Elisha Benjamin Andrews, class of 1870, began his quest to admit women to Brown for the first time.

Redding participated in important University affairs, including the 1975 University Hall takeover.

News, University News

The Ivy League’s first Black faculty member: J. Saunders Redding’s impact on literature and academia

February 18, 2021 0 comments

Just over 60 years ago, long before Brown’s Africana Studies department and concentration came to be, a course on “African Americans in American Literature” was offered.

Trailblazing Black athletes and coaches, William White, class of 1883, Fritz Pollard, class of 1919 and Jackie Court, a former gymnastics coach, contributed to the development of Brown Athletics on and off the field.

Sports

Pioneers on the playing field: Bruno’s first Black athletes and coaches

February 18, 2021 0 comments

While today’s Brown Athletics program displays diversity among its coaches and athletes, this has not always been the case. Throughout the history of Brown Athletics, trailblazing Black athletes and coaches have battled racism and adversity to earn athletic achievements while helping to build a more equitable program.

Lawyer Louis Redding, a member of Brown’s class of 1923, is remembered for his important role in the landmark 1954  Supreme Court Case Brown v. Board of Education.

News, University News

Louis Redding: the life and legacy of a trailblazing lawyer, champion against school segregation

February 25, 2021 0 comments

May 17, 1954 marked a landmark Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education: From that day forward, it was unconstitutional to establish racially segregated schools.

Augustus White ’57, a veteran of the Brown football team, and Rebekah Splaine Salwasser ’01, who played for Brown women’s soccer, went on to illustrious careers off the playing field.

Sports

Pioneers on the playing field: Bruno’s Black former athletes and their impact today

February 25, 2021 0 comments

Last week, The Herald spotlighted Black coaches and athletes who played foundational roles in building today’s Brown athletics program. This week, two modern-day Black athletes who had success on the field at Brown and have gone on to have impressive careers outside of sports will be featured.

Alpha Phi Alpha has reestablished itself as a presence on campus has focused on building community for Black students since growing its membership in 2018.

News, University News

‘Founded out of resistance’: Brown’s oldest Black fraternity celebrates 100 years

February 25, 2021 0 comments

On a Saturday night in February 1923, the brothers of the Alpha Gamma chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha held an initiation ceremony to welcome three new members to their ranks. With the addition of two active members and an honorary member — a renowned Black physician in Providence — the fledgling fraternity began to grow.