University News

Former student asks to seal records in sexual assault case

Motion would bar release of records to Providence College student allegedly assaulted last year

By
University News Editor
Monday, October 6, 2014

A former Brown undergraduate who was investigated for allegedly sexually assaulting a female Providence College student last November has requested that the Rhode Island Superior Court seal records in the case, the Providence Journal reported Friday.

The alleged perpetrator, who withdrew from the University before the beginning of the school year, faces no criminal charges after a grand jury chose not to indict him in August. John Grasso and Stephen Brouillard, counsels for the accused student, filed a motion seeking to prohibit the records’ public release “to prevent further disclosure of (the client’s) private and personal information,” the Journal reported.

Hoping to obtain all case records that relate to her in order to pursue a restraining order against the former Brown student and another student involved in the case who is still enrolled at the University, the PC student submitted an Access to Public Records Act request for the documents last month, the Journal reported.

Among these documents is an unreleased Providence police report that recounts the alleged sexual assault and evidence collected, NBC 10 reported.

The Rhode Island Attorney General’s office was set to hand over the records, with names redacted, to the PC student before the lawyers’ motion, said Amy Kempe, public information officer for the Attorney General’s office.

“It’s the opinion of the attorney general’s office and the attorney general himself that the records are public, albeit redacted to protect the privacy of the individuals,” Kempe told the Journal.

The attorney general will not release the records until the court reaches a decision on the motion, she said.

Judge Alice Gibney is expected to rule on whether to seal the records in the next several days, NBC 10 reported.

  • K Murphy

    What action has Brown taken against the students? Or are they waiting until the records are sealed to review the case??? So convenient

    • Alum

      Given that the burden of proof for an indictment is LOWER than that of a student conduct hearing (probable cause vs. preponderance of evidence) there’s literally no reason this student could/would/should be found guilty by the university of anything.