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Review

The Setonian
Review

‘The Interview’: a humorous view of real-world controversies

“You know what’s more destructive than a nuclear bomb? Words,” says North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s character, played by Randall Park, in the film “The Interview.” In the wake of North Korea’s cyberattack on Sony Pictures Entertainment and threats of violence against the United States, ...


The Setonian
Review

Powerful portrayals fail to solve ‘Theory of Everything’

A former teacher of mine once declared — with appropriate grandiosity — “If God speaks to us at all, he does so in number.” There’s something strangely appealing in his proclamation. Religious texts? Nonsense. Sworn recollections of miracles and visions? Insignificant. A deep, unspoken and ...


The Setonian
Review

Taste of India fails to match Kabob and Curry quality

The temptation to draw a comparison with local icon Kabob and Curry threatens to color perceptions of any other Indian food on College Hill, and in visiting Taste of India on Wickenden Street, it’s hard not to judge the restaurant solely in relation to Sunday mornings in the Blue Room. While Kabob ...


yoon_snoopy_yoon
Review

Snooping through Schulz’s world

“Unhappiness is funny. Happiness is not funny at all.” Cartoonist Charles Schulz makes this statement in “The Man Who Saw Snoopy,” a play written and directed by Lenny Schwartz that opened Thursday in the Bell Street Chapel’s DayDream Theatre on Federal Hill. He reflects on the changing nature ...


The Setonian
Review

Trinity Rep reimagines ‘Hamlet’ through the absurd

My first experience with “Hamlet” was watching an episode of “The Simpsons.” Bart was the thought-tormented prince, Marge was Gertrude, Moe was Claudius and Homer was the ghost of the dead King Hamlet. To a young boy of five or six, thrilled by the opportunity of maturity, nothing could be more ...


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Review

‘Hype Hero’ sketches corporatist caricature

The arts have never been a stranger to the vilification of greed, but the recent combination of economic recession, Occupy movements and increased populism have brought a resurgent relevance to the story of the systematic underdog. This dynamic manifests in recent releases like “The Dark Knight Rises,” ...


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Arts & Culture

Difficult women collide with serious money in ‘She’

The first satisfying feature of “She” — the group exhibition with the ambitious subtitle of “picturing women at the turn of the 21st century” ­— is its not having been called “Her.” The nominative pronoun seems to promise a feminist inflection, a show that will deliver to us women as ...


The Setonian
Review

Interactive play reflects city’s diversity

Brown students can sometimes be out of touch with the realities of the city they live in. But they can at least partially remedy this by seeing “A Kind of Providence,” a play in which the essence of the city shines through in all its diversity, grit and creativity. Director Ashley Teague GS, a ...


The Setonian
Review

Wolitzer ’81 explores the adolescent psyche

Only rarely does a young adult novel achieve the complexity and gravitas of general literary fiction, which perhaps explains why writers in the latter category rarely seek to appeal to the former. Of course, there are notable exceptions, including Carl Hiaasen, Philippa Gregory and — as of the Sept. ...


The Setonian
Review

PW parties in space with ‘Song for a Future Generation’

Some time far in the future, amid a nebulous myriad of mystical galaxies and celestial entities, a space-themed party assembles people invited from all over the universe to view the detonation of a star. The raucous party is hosted by three “sisters,” who are soon revealed to be clones. Among the ...


The Setonian
Review

This time around, ‘Eleanor Rigby’ fights the loneliness

The comfortable silence draping the couple is interrupted by the end of the meal. The woman takes off her heels. “I’ll get a head start, then you follow when you think they aren’t looking,” she says. Seconds later, he sprints out of the restaurant, urging her on with the waiter in hot pursuit. ...


The Setonian
Review

‘Sweeney Todd’ occupies Wall Street

Modern-day reinventions frequently come across as gimmicky in theater and film. Too often, they serve as better marketing than art — or, perhaps more dangerously, they can come from the monomaniacal will of a rogue director, so concerned with his or her creative impulses that the reinvention ends ...


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Review

Listen to your art: Exhibition explores physicality of sound

Perhaps it is rather cliche to convey imperfection through visual art, but to experience it aurally is an innovative concept. This is indeed at the heart of the “Audible Spaces: Tristan Perich, Zarouhie Abdalian and [The User],” an exhibition that constructs physical space around sound. Upon entering ...


The Setonian
Review

Local artists celebrate ‘Month of Peace’

Walking through the Peace Art Exhibit is a Twilight Zone-esque venture. At first, it is easy to stare with academic detachment at the results of this experiment, which gave blank wall space to various members of the Providence community and asked them to represent on it the abstract idea of peace. ...


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Review

R.I. Seafood Festival attracts students, locals

The enticing aroma of freshly-caught seafood mingled with the refreshing breeze blowing off the Providence River and the mellow sounds of live bands to establish the laidback atmosphere at India Point Park, where over 20,000 people gathered over two days for the fourth annual Rhode Island Seafood Festival. “It’s ...


The Setonian
Review

Student band Off-White rocks Wriston

On Tuesday evening, Wriston Quadrangle rung with more than just the sounds of fraternity brothers playing cornhole and returning students picnicking over Sharpe Refectory take-out. Riffs drifted out from a makeshift stage as Off-White, a student rock band, played for the crowd attending the campus welcome ...


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Review

‘Violet’ finds meaning in the skin-deep

“Violet,” directed by Skylar Fox ’15 and running in the Production Workshop Downspace this Friday through Monday, deals with problems of appearance, and avoiding the cliche, it does not discredit the power of the superficial. The musical follows the titular character’s quest to heal a disfiguring ...


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Review

Imprisoned brother vies for, wins attention in ‘Bronx’

In the very first scene of “El Grito del Bronx,” light illuminates the center of the stage as Lulu, wearing a white wedding dress, glides toward center stage, approaching a frame. She contemplates this simulation of a mirror and gazes through it as an unknown man, eventually revealed to be her ...


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Review

‘Grand Budapest Hotel’ leaves no vacancies

In 1993, Ralph Fiennes harrowed audiences as Nazi war criminal Amon Goeth, calmly sniping concentration camp workers from his balcony for nothing more than pre-breakfast entertainment. Twenty-one years later, the “Schindler’s List” actor stars in “The Grand Budapest Hotel,” a film currently ...





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